RARE  RISINGSTARS 2013 The UK’s Top 10 Black Students
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No. 4

 

Ify Aniebo

MSc Public Health
University of Oxford
Academics and Media
Ify Aniebo


Ify’s mission is to make scientific issues and research accessible to the masses, and with an online health resource averaging thirty thousand views per month, she is well on her way towards achieving her goal.

“My aim is to express scientific ideas in non scientific jargon and to rebuild the connection between science and the average person.”


Ify’s main area of interest and research is malaria. Having grown up in Nigeria, a country blighted by malarial illness, Ify became intrigued at how other parts of the world had been able to eliminate it and decided to pursue a career in science. Ify’s first degree was in Genetics from Queen Mary University of London; she then completed a Masters in Applied Biomolecular Technology at the University of Nottingham and later worked at the top research institutions Medimmune, Illumina and the Sanger Institute, all in Cambridge.

Her initial curiosity in explaining malarial illnesses has since spread to finding explanations for other diseases and health issues, which she now shares as simply as possible through her online resource, the African Health Magazine. Ify started the website to educate young Africans about health issues and to provide a trusted daily resource for healthier living.

Ify’s work has been recognised in a number of awards held both in the UK and in her native country. In Nigeria, she was awarded the prestigious Young Person of the Year Award 2010 and The Best Use of Science Award 2010, and was voted one of the ‘top ten women to look out for’. Ify also won the Best Photography award given by Oxford’s department of public health, and has also been granted numerous scholarships, the most recent of which have come from the Wellcome trust and Exxon‑mobil.

“It’s always important to highlight the struggles that come with success. It’s not easy but all you can do is make good decisions and go with your heart.”

Ify takes great pride in being able to pass on her love of science to the next generation and is a mentor to young female scientists on the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine’s young scientists’ programme.

Ify is currently working on a docu‑series with Mantaray Media, to educate people about the social impact of ailments like HIV and sickle cell anaemia.

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